(Re)Deployment Problems of EARs, EJBs with Netbeans 6.0 and Glassfish v2 solved - significant speedup in 6.1

After my last post about redeployment-problems with Netbeans 6.0, I got a nice and amazing email from Vince Kraemer (Sun) :

"I recently read your blog entry and decided that I should take another look at this.  I think the issue you are running into may be addressed by the changes we made recently". He filed a bug for me ...and solved the problem. You can find the solution in the 6.1 stream

I tried immediately to deploy some p4j5 samples, and it worked (there are still issues with "Clean And Build"). However the "Undeploy And Deploy" procedure was significantly slower, than in Netbeans 6.0.

The next email from Vince (one day later - at Sunday!!) cleared this issue as well:  "You may want to consider using 'Run' instead of 'Undeploy and Deploy' as part of your workflow.  The undeploy and deploy action deletes and then recopies the classes and jars into the deployment directory.  The run action only copies the changed classes and jars into the deployment directory...."

Indeed using the "Run" action was really fast. The deployment of the RunAndBike application (I will release it next time, the whole source code is already available in p4j5) took only few seconds. Netbeans 6.1 wasn't able to open the JSF-pages in the visual designer (because of binding issues). However I use 6.1 for deployment of the business layer. It works great so far.

Windows users have the following options:

  1. Disabling the directory deployment in Netbeans 6.0
  2. Using the Netbeans 6.1 daily builds with the "Run" option for directory deployment.
  3. Installing another operating system :-).
Because Vista Ultimate takes about 5 minutes to boot on my machine (Core Duo, 2.4 GHz, 4 GB RAM) and needs about 1GB Ram just to display the desktop I'm going to consider the last option as well :-). Btw. the openness, responsiveness, huge amount of open documentation and the fast innovation pace makes the difference between Netbeans/Glassfish community and the others (see Thinking Loud About Netbeans And Eclipse). I already made similar, positive experience with Glassfish Monitoring, TopLink Essentials and now Netbeans developers/committers.


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Comments:

Option 3 is probably the option with the best long term effect :-)

Posted by Michael Bien on January 20, 2008 at 02:57 PM CET #

Chose option number 3ADAM!!!
When will you buy the new Mac Book Air ;) and develop with Leopard :)

Greetings from Stuttgart
Daniel

Posted by Daniel on January 20, 2008 at 04:46 PM CET #

Hi Daniel,

as you probably now, I need my machine for development (and Mac Book Air has 1.8 GHz) :-). However, probaby I should start my career as an architect / manager as well - then it would be fine for PowerPoint etc. :-)

adam

Posted by Adam Bien on January 20, 2008 at 05:21 PM CET #

Glad to help.

I would recommend switching to Solaris... but I may be a bit biased...

One other note: if you use 'Run', instead of 'Undeploy and Deploy', you do not need to upgrade to 6.1... That has been working for a while.

Posted by vince kraemer on January 20, 2008 at 06:56 PM CET #

Vince,

putting Solaris on the desktop is a little bit too radical for me (especially on a notebook), but your suggestion could be interesting for my server,

thanks for your help and nice comment,
adam

Posted by Adam Bien on January 20, 2008 at 08:12 PM CET #

Hi Adam
You don't have to install Solaris on your system. You can run Solaris as a VMWare guest OS.
Sun has Solaris Developer Express preinstalled as a VMWare VM.
http://www.sun.com/download/products.xml?id=4702f982

I use the Solaris guest OS on my XP laptop whenever I need and it works well except when running multicast based distributed apps.

All you need is the free VMWare player installed on your windows, Linux or mac box and place the vmx file in one of your directories.

Start the player and select the Solaris vmx file and it starts running as a guest OS. (The readme in the download bundle contains the root password).

You would need about 2 GB of RAM minimum to be able to run this without painfully slow display though, given that Vista/XP hogs much of the RAM.

hth
Shreedhar

Posted by Shreedhar on January 20, 2008 at 09:45 PM CET #

Shreedhar,

I got a Solaris DVD at the OOP Conference. ...and will install solaris in VM first :-).

regards,

adam

Posted by Adam Bien on January 24, 2008 at 05:23 PM CET #

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